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Humanitarian Demining R&D Program Overview
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Lebanon
Field Evaluations

The Lebanese Republic is contaminated with mines and explosive remnants of war (ERW) as a legacy of 15 years of civil conflict and two Israeli invasions and occupations of south Lebanon (1978 and 1982) that ended in May 2000. The July–August 2006 hostilities by Israel also resulted in heavy new contamination from cluster munition remnants in southern Lebanon. Mine contamination affects the north and south of the country, though most contamination is found in the south. The Lebanon Mine Action Center (LMAC) landmine contamination covers about 1,500 suspected mined areas covering 30km2,of which 950 areas are close to the 118km-long Blue Line bordering Israel (the line of withdrawal of the Israel Defence Forces). At the end of 2014, Lebanon had almost 29.5km2 of confirmed hazardous areas (CHAs) containing mines, not including the Blue Line. Of this, 1.28km2 of mined area were cleared in 2014 which reduces the contamination estimate to some 28.2km2. As of 2013, one-quarter of the 9.5km2 of Blue Line minefields had been cleared leaving almost 7.3km2 to release. According to the mid-term review, clearance of Blue Line minefields was behind target due to underfunding and political decisions. Cluster munition contamination originates primarily from the conflict with Israel in July–August 2006, although some contamination remains from conflict in the 1980s. Contamination by cluster munition remnants was estimated to be approximately 55km2, although the estimate has since been revised upwards through survey to 57.8km2 across 1,484 areas in the three regions of South Lebanon, Bekaa, and Mount Lebanon due to the discovery of new contaminated areas. There is an estimated 17.85km2 over 799 SHAs of contamination remaining, constituting 31% of the estimated 57.8km2 of affected area.

Sources: To Walk the Earth in Safety, 2016
Landmine Monitor Report, 2015

Multi-tool Attachments

Multi-tool Attachments

The Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program has developed a wide variety of excavator and loader based tools for mechanical mine clearance. These attachments give deminers the capability to perform area preparation, technical survey and mine clearance from a safe area. Tools that have proven useful include vegetation cutters, grapples, tillers, and buckets for sifting, grinding, and crushing. The HD R&D Program has modified several small, medium and large class excavators with armor protection and the interfaces needed to use these tools in various demining environments. Operational Field Evaluations (OFE) can be performed with HD R&D Program developed excavators or loaders, or with just the tools mounted to the demining organization`s own host equipment. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

PARTNERS: Mines Advisory Group; Golden West Humanitarian Foundation; The HALO Trust

 

Terrapin

Terrapin

The Terrapin is a small, versatile remote controlled excavator-based system designed to perform area preparation and clearance tasks in anti-personnel (AP) contaminated minefields. The Terrapins small platform based system makes it fuel efficient as well as light weight. The six ton Terrapin features several attachments which give it the capability to clear vegetation and obstacles so demining teams can access the mine suspect areas, and mechanically remove and neutralize mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

PARTNERS: Mines Advisory Group - Lebanon

 

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